Discussion:
USN Combat Corpsman Paul K. O'Connor
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claviger
2019-05-09 23:09:56 UTC
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USN Corpsman Paul K. O'Connor served in combat during
his tour of duty in Vietnam earning a Purple Heart. After his
training at Bethesda Naval Hospital he would later became
a Deputy Sheriff in Brevard County, FL. To say he learned
about rifle and pistol wounds the hard way hands-on would
be an accurate statement.

Paul O'Connor was interviewed by William Matson Law for his book,
In the Eye of History: Disclosures in the JFK Assassination Medical
Evidence.

Law: After you traced the wound, what happened then?

O'Connor: After that, we looked at the head wound and found
that there were no bullets in the cranium. Minute fragments
were scattered through he bone area of the cranium front and
back.

I remember distinctly because, having worked in funeral homes
since I was thirteen years old, I had seen bullet wounds before,
and also I served in Vietnam and saw bullet wounds there.

It looked to me like a bomb had exploded inside his brain and
blew out the whole side of his head. I've never seen a more
horrendous destruction of the cranium, unless it was done by
a very high caliber weapon. I found out later that it was done
by a Mannlicher Carcano - a cheap Italian rifle - just about what
I would call a thirty caliber or a thirty-thirty caliber rifle.

Law: In your opinion is it capable of doing that kind of damage?

O'Connor: Absolutely not.
bigdog
2019-05-11 01:28:04 UTC
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Post by claviger
USN Corpsman Paul K. O'Connor served in combat during
his tour of duty in Vietnam earning a Purple Heart. After his
training at Bethesda Naval Hospital he would later became
a Deputy Sheriff in Brevard County, FL. To say he learned
about rifle and pistol wounds the hard way hands-on would
be an accurate statement.
Paul O'Connor was interviewed by William Matson Law for his book,
In the Eye of History: Disclosures in the JFK Assassination Medical
Evidence.
Law: After you traced the wound, what happened then?
O'Connor: After that, we looked at the head wound and found
that there were no bullets in the cranium. Minute fragments
were scattered through he bone area of the cranium front and
back.
I remember distinctly because, having worked in funeral homes
since I was thirteen years old, I had seen bullet wounds before,
and also I served in Vietnam and saw bullet wounds there.
It looked to me like a bomb had exploded inside his brain and
blew out the whole side of his head. I've never seen a more
horrendous destruction of the cranium, unless it was done by
a very high caliber weapon. I found out later that it was done
by a Mannlicher Carcano - a cheap Italian rifle - just about what
I would call a thirty caliber or a thirty-thirty caliber rifle.
Law: In your opinion is it capable of doing that kind of damage?
O'Connor: Absolutely not.
Seriously? You've resorted to citing O'Connor. I suppose you could find
somebody less credible but it is hard to imagine how?
claviger
2019-05-12 21:58:28 UTC
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Post by bigdog
Post by claviger
USN Corpsman Paul K. O'Connor served in combat during
his tour of duty in Vietnam earning a Purple Heart. After his
training at Bethesda Naval Hospital he would later became
a Deputy Sheriff in Brevard County, FL. To say he learned
about rifle and pistol wounds the hard way hands-on would
be an accurate statement.
Paul O'Connor was interviewed by William Matson Law for his book,
In the Eye of History: Disclosures in the JFK Assassination Medical
Evidence.
Law: After you traced the wound, what happened then?
O'Connor: After that, we looked at the head wound and found
that there were no bullets in the cranium. Minute fragments
were scattered through he bone area of the cranium front and
back.
I remember distinctly because, having worked in funeral homes
since I was thirteen years old, I had seen bullet wounds before,
and also I served in Vietnam and saw bullet wounds there.
It looked to me like a bomb had exploded inside his brain and
blew out the whole side of his head. I've never seen a more
horrendous destruction of the cranium, unless it was done by
a very high caliber weapon. I found out later that it was done
by a Mannlicher Carcano - a cheap Italian rifle - just about what
I would call a thirty caliber or a thirty-thirty caliber rifle.
Law: In your opinion is it capable of doing that kind of damage?
O'Connor: Absolutely not.
Seriously? You've resorted to citing O'Connor. I suppose you could
find somebody less credible but it is hard to imagine how?
I consider O'Connor a solid witness. Obviously he was not aware
the brain had been removed before the autopsy and for whatever
reason CDR Humes did not share that info with him.

O'Connor was in-country Vietnam and wounded in combat. Would
think he observed various wounds on both US Marines and enemy
soldiers. Then his next tour of duty was Bethesda NH for probably
12 to 24 months.

After his Navy career he became a Deputy Sheriff in Florida. Most
likely he saw wounded victims and suspects, learning more about
weapons and the wounds they make.
Mark
2019-05-13 23:39:12 UTC
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Post by claviger
Post by bigdog
Post by claviger
USN Corpsman Paul K. O'Connor served in combat during
his tour of duty in Vietnam earning a Purple Heart. After his
training at Bethesda Naval Hospital he would later became
a Deputy Sheriff in Brevard County, FL. To say he learned
about rifle and pistol wounds the hard way hands-on would
be an accurate statement.
Paul O'Connor was interviewed by William Matson Law for his book,
In the Eye of History: Disclosures in the JFK Assassination Medical
Evidence.
Law: After you traced the wound, what happened then?
O'Connor: After that, we looked at the head wound and found
that there were no bullets in the cranium. Minute fragments
were scattered through he bone area of the cranium front and
back.
I remember distinctly because, having worked in funeral homes
since I was thirteen years old, I had seen bullet wounds before,
and also I served in Vietnam and saw bullet wounds there.
It looked to me like a bomb had exploded inside his brain and
blew out the whole side of his head. I've never seen a more
horrendous destruction of the cranium, unless it was done by
a very high caliber weapon. I found out later that it was done
by a Mannlicher Carcano - a cheap Italian rifle - just about what
I would call a thirty caliber or a thirty-thirty caliber rifle.
Law: In your opinion is it capable of doing that kind of damage?
O'Connor: Absolutely not.
Seriously? You've resorted to citing O'Connor. I suppose you could
find somebody less credible but it is hard to imagine how?
I consider O'Connor a solid witness. Obviously he was not aware
the brain had been removed before the autopsy and for whatever
reason CDR Humes did not share that info with him.
O'Connor was in-country Vietnam and wounded in combat. Would
think he observed various wounds on both US Marines and enemy
soldiers. Then his next tour of duty was Bethesda NH for probably
12 to 24 months.
After his Navy career he became a Deputy Sheriff in Florida. Most
likely he saw wounded victims and suspects, learning more about
weapons and the wounds they make.
I've posted before about O'Connor's interview with HSCA staffers Jim Kelly
and Andy Purdy.

Here's their report:

http://www.aarclibrary.org/publib/jfk/arrb/master_med_set/md64/html/Image7.htm

You should read the whole report to get some idea of O'Connor's -- I won't
say credibility, but his problems.

I thank him for his service time, particularly in the hellhole of the
Vietnam war. Mark
claviger
2019-05-15 01:19:04 UTC
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Post by Mark
Post by claviger
Post by bigdog
Post by claviger
USN Corpsman Paul K. O'Connor served in combat during
his tour of duty in Vietnam earning a Purple Heart. After his
training at Bethesda Naval Hospital he would later became
a Deputy Sheriff in Brevard County, FL. To say he learned
about rifle and pistol wounds the hard way hands-on would
be an accurate statement.
Paul O'Connor was interviewed by William Matson Law for his book,
In the Eye of History: Disclosures in the JFK Assassination Medical
Evidence.
Law: After you traced the wound, what happened then?
O'Connor: After that, we looked at the head wound and found
that there were no bullets in the cranium. Minute fragments
were scattered through he bone area of the cranium front and
back.
I remember distinctly because, having worked in funeral homes
since I was thirteen years old, I had seen bullet wounds before,
and also I served in Vietnam and saw bullet wounds there.
It looked to me like a bomb had exploded inside his brain and
blew out the whole side of his head. I've never seen a more
horrendous destruction of the cranium, unless it was done by
a very high caliber weapon. I found out later that it was done
by a Mannlicher Carcano - a cheap Italian rifle - just about what
I would call a thirty caliber or a thirty-thirty caliber rifle.
Law: In your opinion is it capable of doing that kind of damage?
O'Connor: Absolutely not.
Seriously? You've resorted to citing O'Connor. I suppose you could
find somebody less credible but it is hard to imagine how?
I consider O'Connor a solid witness. Obviously he was not aware
the brain had been removed before the autopsy and for whatever
reason CDR Humes did not share that info with him.
O'Connor was in-country Vietnam and wounded in combat. Would
think he observed various wounds on both US Marines and enemy
soldiers. Then his next tour of duty was Bethesda NH for probably
12 to 24 months.
After his Navy career he became a Deputy Sheriff in Florida. Most
likely he saw wounded victims and suspects, learning more about
weapons and the wounds they make.
I've posted before about O'Connor's interview with HSCA staffers Jim Kelly
and Andy Purdy.
http://www.aarclibrary.org/publib/jfk/arrb/master_med_set/md64/html/Image7.htm
You should read the whole report to get some idea of O'Connor's -- I won't
say credibility, but his problems.
I thank him for his service time, particularly in the hellhole of the
Vietnam war. Mark
O'Connor got this part basically right after over more than decade:
Page 11 of 11
http://www.aarclibrary.org/publib/jfk/arrb/master_med_set/md64/html/Image9a.htm

He was asked to leave the room for 30-40 minutes and was not
aware of the entrance wound on back of the head, which would
explain why he thought the head shot came from the right side.
Other than that, I don't see much wrong with his observations.
Anthony Marsh
2019-05-16 00:38:48 UTC
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Post by claviger
Post by Mark
Post by claviger
Post by bigdog
Post by claviger
USN Corpsman Paul K. O'Connor served in combat during
his tour of duty in Vietnam earning a Purple Heart. After his
training at Bethesda Naval Hospital he would later became
a Deputy Sheriff in Brevard County, FL. To say he learned
about rifle and pistol wounds the hard way hands-on would
be an accurate statement.
Paul O'Connor was interviewed by William Matson Law for his book,
In the Eye of History: Disclosures in the JFK Assassination Medical
Evidence.
Law: After you traced the wound, what happened then?
O'Connor: After that, we looked at the head wound and found
that there were no bullets in the cranium. Minute fragments
were scattered through he bone area of the cranium front and
back.
I remember distinctly because, having worked in funeral homes
since I was thirteen years old, I had seen bullet wounds before,
and also I served in Vietnam and saw bullet wounds there.
It looked to me like a bomb had exploded inside his brain and
blew out the whole side of his head. I've never seen a more
horrendous destruction of the cranium, unless it was done by
a very high caliber weapon. I found out later that it was done
by a Mannlicher Carcano - a cheap Italian rifle - just about what
I would call a thirty caliber or a thirty-thirty caliber rifle.
Law: In your opinion is it capable of doing that kind of damage?
O'Connor: Absolutely not.
Seriously? You've resorted to citing O'Connor. I suppose you could
find somebody less credible but it is hard to imagine how?
I consider O'Connor a solid witness. Obviously he was not aware
the brain had been removed before the autopsy and for whatever
reason CDR Humes did not share that info with him.
O'Connor was in-country Vietnam and wounded in combat. Would
think he observed various wounds on both US Marines and enemy
soldiers. Then his next tour of duty was Bethesda NH for probably
12 to 24 months.
After his Navy career he became a Deputy Sheriff in Florida. Most
likely he saw wounded victims and suspects, learning more about
weapons and the wounds they make.
I've posted before about O'Connor's interview with HSCA staffers Jim Kelly
and Andy Purdy.
http://www.aarclibrary.org/publib/jfk/arrb/master_med_set/md64/html/Image7.htm
You should read the whole report to get some idea of O'Connor's -- I won't
say credibility, but his problems.
I thank him for his service time, particularly in the hellhole of the
Vietnam war. Mark
Page 11 of 11
http://www.aarclibrary.org/publib/jfk/arrb/master_med_set/md64/html/Image9a.htm
He was asked to leave the room for 30-40 minutes and was not
aware of the entrance wound on back of the head, which would
explain why he thought the head shot came from the right side.
Other than that, I don't see much wrong with his observations.
I assume you think tha he could not see a hole on the BACK of the head
because when he first saw JFK on the table the back of his head was
lying down on the table. So maybe he only saw the bullet hole in the
forehead.
claviger
2019-05-16 13:55:21 UTC
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Post by Anthony Marsh
Post by claviger
Post by Mark
Post by claviger
I consider O'Connor a solid witness. Obviously he was not aware
the brain had been removed before the autopsy and for whatever
reason CDR Humes did not share that info with him.
O'Connor was in-country Vietnam and wounded in combat. Would
think he observed various wounds on both US Marines and enemy
soldiers. Then his next tour of duty was Bethesda NH for probably
12 to 24 months.
After his Navy career he became a Deputy Sheriff in Florida. Most
likely he saw wounded victims and suspects, learning more about
weapons and the wounds they make.
I've posted before about O'Connor's interview with HSCA staffers Jim Kelly
and Andy Purdy.
http://www.aarclibrary.org/publib/jfk/arrb/master_med_set/md64/html/Image7.htm
You should read the whole report to get some idea of O'Connor's -- I won't
say credibility, but his problems.
I thank him for his service time, particularly in the hellhole of the
Vietnam war. Mark
Page 11 of 11
http://www.aarclibrary.org/publib/jfk/arrb/master_med_set/md64/html/Image9a.htm
He was asked to leave the room for 30-40 minutes and was not
aware of the entrance wound on back of the head, which would
explain why he thought the head shot came from the right side.
Other than that, I don't see much wrong with his observations.
I assume you think tha he could not see a hole on the BACK of the head
because when he first saw JFK on the table the back of his head was
lying down on the table. So maybe he only saw the bullet hole in the
forehead.
The only wound in the forehead was under an exit
flap from a triangular shaped a fragment.
Anthony Marsh
2019-05-18 15:24:07 UTC
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Post by claviger
Post by Anthony Marsh
Post by claviger
Post by Mark
Post by claviger
I consider O'Connor a solid witness. Obviously he was not aware
the brain had been removed before the autopsy and for whatever
reason CDR Humes did not share that info with him.
O'Connor was in-country Vietnam and wounded in combat. Would
think he observed various wounds on both US Marines and enemy
soldiers. Then his next tour of duty was Bethesda NH for probably
12 to 24 months.
After his Navy career he became a Deputy Sheriff in Florida. Most
likely he saw wounded victims and suspects, learning more about
weapons and the wounds they make.
I've posted before about O'Connor's interview with HSCA staffers Jim Kelly
and Andy Purdy.
http://www.aarclibrary.org/publib/jfk/arrb/master_med_set/md64/html/Image7.htm
You should read the whole report to get some idea of O'Connor's -- I won't
say credibility, but his problems.
I thank him for his service time, particularly in the hellhole of the
Vietnam war. Mark
Page 11 of 11
http://www.aarclibrary.org/publib/jfk/arrb/master_med_set/md64/html/Image9a.htm
He was asked to leave the room for 30-40 minutes and was not
aware of the entrance wound on back of the head, which would
explain why he thought the head shot came from the right side.
Other than that, I don't see much wrong with his observations.
I assume you think tha he could not see a hole on the BACK of the head
because when he first saw JFK on the table the back of his head was
lying down on the table. So maybe he only saw the bullet hole in the
forehead.
The only wound in the forehead was under an exit
flap from a triangular shaped a fragment.
Interesting. Show me what you mean.
Steve M. Galbraith
2019-05-17 00:41:40 UTC
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Post by claviger
Post by bigdog
Post by claviger
USN Corpsman Paul K. O'Connor served in combat during
his tour of duty in Vietnam earning a Purple Heart. After his
training at Bethesda Naval Hospital he would later became
a Deputy Sheriff in Brevard County, FL. To say he learned
about rifle and pistol wounds the hard way hands-on would
be an accurate statement.
Paul O'Connor was interviewed by William Matson Law for his book,
In the Eye of History: Disclosures in the JFK Assassination Medical
Evidence.
Law: After you traced the wound, what happened then?
O'Connor: After that, we looked at the head wound and found
that there were no bullets in the cranium. Minute fragments
were scattered through he bone area of the cranium front and
back.
I remember distinctly because, having worked in funeral homes
since I was thirteen years old, I had seen bullet wounds before,
and also I served in Vietnam and saw bullet wounds there.
It looked to me like a bomb had exploded inside his brain and
blew out the whole side of his head. I've never seen a more
horrendous destruction of the cranium, unless it was done by
a very high caliber weapon. I found out later that it was done
by a Mannlicher Carcano - a cheap Italian rifle - just about what
I would call a thirty caliber or a thirty-thirty caliber rifle.
Law: In your opinion is it capable of doing that kind of damage?
O'Connor: Absolutely not.
Seriously? You've resorted to citing O'Connor. I suppose you could
find somebody less credible but it is hard to imagine how?
I consider O'Connor a solid witness. Obviously he was not aware
the brain had been removed before the autopsy and for whatever
reason CDR Humes did not share that info with him.
O'Connor was in-country Vietnam and wounded in combat. Would
think he observed various wounds on both US Marines and enemy
soldiers. Then his next tour of duty was Bethesda NH for probably
12 to 24 months.
After his Navy career he became a Deputy Sheriff in Florida. Most
likely he saw wounded victims and suspects, learning more about
weapons and the wounds they make.
Sorry, the brain was removed BEFORE the autopsy? How did that happen? They
removed fragments of a bullet from JFK's brain during the autopsy. If
there was no brain then where were these fragments located?

And the x-rays of the skull show minute particles - "snowstorm" - in it.
If there was no brain then were these particles floating in empty space?
There had to be something for these particles to be deposited in.

What am I getting wrong here, please?
claviger
2019-05-18 01:28:43 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Steve M. Galbraith
Post by claviger
I consider O'Connor a solid witness. Obviously he was not aware
the brain had been removed before the autopsy and for whatever
reason CDR Humes did not share that info with him.
O'Connor was in-country Vietnam and wounded in combat. Would
think he observed various wounds on both US Marines and enemy
soldiers. Then his next tour of duty was Bethesda NH for probably
12 to 24 months.
After his Navy career he became a Deputy Sheriff in Florida. Most
likely he saw wounded victims and suspects, learning more about
weapons and the wounds they make.
Sorry, the brain was removed BEFORE the autopsy? How did that happen?
Standard Autopsy Protocol:
(A) Visual examination
(B) Photos + X-rays
(C) Torso Procedure
(D) Brain Removal

In this case, because of extensive damage to the Cranium,
brain examination and removal came first after Photos and
X-rays.
Post by Steve M. Galbraith
They removed fragments of a bullet from JFK's brain during
the autopsy. If there was no brain then where were these
fragments located?
I would assume: (C) Brain Examination/Removal
Post by Steve M. Galbraith
And the x-rays of the skull show minute particles - "snowstorm" - in it.
Correct.
Post by Steve M. Galbraith
If there was no brain then were these particles floating in empty space?
There had to be something for these particles to be deposited in.
What am I getting wrong here, please?
ARRB DEPOSITION OF DR. J THORNTON BOSWELL, 2/26/96
http://mcadams.posc.mu.edu/russ/testimony/boswella.htm


HSCA Deposition of Pierre Finck - Kennedy Assassination Home Page
mcadams.posc.mu.edu/russ/testimony/finckhsca.htm
Dr. Finck, we are going to try to take you back to the night of the actual
autopsy .... Pierre, in your subsequent testimony in the trial I believe
you were asked about ...
TESTIMONY OF PIERRE A. FINCK
http://mcadams.posc.mu.edu/russ/testimony/finckhsca.htm
Dr. Finck arrived 30 minutes after the autopsy began:
http://mcadams.posc.mu.edu/russ/testimony/finckhsca.htm
Mr. PURDY. Please state your full name and address.
Dr. FINCK. My first name is Pierre, P-i-e-r-r-e, middle initial A.,
last name Finck, F-i-n-c-k. My address is Avenue D'Orbaix,
No. 14, 1180 Brussels, Belgium.
Mr. PURDY. What is your present employment?
Dr. FINCK. I am retired doing part time instruction.
Mr. PURDY. The initial questioning for the medical panel will
be conducted by Dr. Charles Petty. Dr. Petty.
Dr. PETTY. Thank you. Dr. Finck, we are going to try to take
you back to the night of the actual autopsy that was carried
on on the body of the then President Kennedy. When did you
arrive first in the autopsy room?
Dr. FINCK. It was approximately 2030 hours, 8:30 p.m.
Dr. PETTY. Was the autopsy in progress at that time?
Dr. FINCK. Yes, it was. I arrived after the start of the autopsy.
claviger
2019-05-19 01:45:02 UTC
Reply
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Post by claviger
Post by Steve M. Galbraith
Post by claviger
I consider O'Connor a solid witness. Obviously he was not aware
the brain had been removed before the autopsy and for whatever
reason CDR Humes did not share that info with him.
O'Connor was in-country Vietnam and wounded in combat. Would
think he observed various wounds on both US Marines and enemy
soldiers. Then his next tour of duty was Bethesda NH for probably
12 to 24 months.
After his Navy career he became a Deputy Sheriff in Florida. Most
likely he saw wounded victims and suspects, learning more about
weapons and the wounds they make.
Sorry, the brain was removed BEFORE the autopsy? How did that happen?
(A) Visual examination
(B) Photos + X-rays
(C) Torso Procedure
(D) Brain Removal
Dr. PETTY. Thank you. Dr. Finck, we are going to try to take
you back to the night of the actual autopsy that was carried
on on the body of the then President Kennedy. When did you
arrive first in the autopsy room?
Dr. FINCK. It was approximately 2030 hours, 8:30 p.m.
Dr. PETTY. Was the autopsy in progress at that time?
Dr. FINCK. Yes, it was. I arrived after the start of the autopsy.
Stringer, John Thomas, Jr, medical photographer
[8] Q: Are you able to determine from these
[9] photographs whether the brain has been removed?
[10] A: No, the brain hasn't been removed.
[11] Q: So, these photographs also would have been
[12] taken right at the beginning of the autopsy?
[13] A: Yes.



CRIMINAL DISTRICT COURT
PARISH OF ORLEANS
STATE OF LOUISIANA
EXCERPT OF THE TESTIMONY TAKEN IN OPEN COURT
February 24, 1969
http://mcadams.posc.mu.edu/russ/testimony/finckshaw.htm

Q: What time did you arrive at Bethesda Naval Hospital in
regard to the autopsy? By that I mean was the autopsy
already begun?

A: When I arrived, X-rays had been taken of the head. I had
been told so over the phone by Dr. Humes when he called
me at home, and I arrived, I would say, a short time after
the beginning of the autopsy, I can't give you an exact time,
it was approximately 8:00 o'clock at night.

Q: Had any work been done on President Kennedy's body in
regard to the performing of the autopsy by the time you got
there?

A: As I recall, the brain had been removed. Dr. Humes told me
that to remove the brain he did not have to carry out the procedure
you carry out when there is no wound in the skull. The wound was
of such an extent, over five inches in diameter, that it was not of a
great difficulty for him to remove this brain, and this is the best of
my recollection. There were no removals of the wound of entry in
the back of the neck, no removal of the wound of entry in the back
of the head prior to my arrival, and I made a positive identification
of both wounds of entry.
Steve M. Galbraith
2019-05-19 02:36:16 UTC
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Post by claviger
Post by Steve M. Galbraith
Post by claviger
I consider O'Connor a solid witness. Obviously he was not aware
the brain had been removed before the autopsy and for whatever
reason CDR Humes did not share that info with him.
O'Connor was in-country Vietnam and wounded in combat. Would
think he observed various wounds on both US Marines and enemy
soldiers. Then his next tour of duty was Bethesda NH for probably
12 to 24 months.
After his Navy career he became a Deputy Sheriff in Florida. Most
likely he saw wounded victims and suspects, learning more about
weapons and the wounds they make.
Sorry, the brain was removed BEFORE the autopsy? How did that happen?
(A) Visual examination
(B) Photos + X-rays
(C) Torso Procedure
(D) Brain Removal
In this case, because of extensive damage to the Cranium,
brain examination and removal came first after Photos and
X-rays.
Post by Steve M. Galbraith
They removed fragments of a bullet from JFK's brain during
the autopsy. If there was no brain then where were these
fragments located?
I would assume: (C) Brain Examination/Removal
Post by Steve M. Galbraith
And the x-rays of the skull show minute particles - "snowstorm" - in it.
Correct.
Post by Steve M. Galbraith
If there was no brain then were these particles floating in empty space?
There had to be something for these particles to be deposited in.
What am I getting wrong here, please?
ARRB DEPOSITION OF DR. J THORNTON BOSWELL, 2/26/96
http://mcadams.posc.mu.edu/russ/testimony/boswella.htm
HSCA Deposition of Pierre Finck - Kennedy Assassination Home Page
mcadams.posc.mu.edu/russ/testimony/finckhsca.htm
Dr. Finck, we are going to try to take you back to the night of the actual
autopsy .... Pierre, in your subsequent testimony in the trial I believe
you were asked about ...
TESTIMONY OF PIERRE A. FINCK
http://mcadams.posc.mu.edu/russ/testimony/finckhsca.htm
http://mcadams.posc.mu.edu/russ/testimony/finckhsca.htm
Mr. PURDY. Please state your full name and address.
Dr. FINCK. My first name is Pierre, P-i-e-r-r-e, middle initial A.,
last name Finck, F-i-n-c-k. My address is Avenue D'Orbaix,
No. 14, 1180 Brussels, Belgium.
Mr. PURDY. What is your present employment?
Dr. FINCK. I am retired doing part time instruction.
Mr. PURDY. The initial questioning for the medical panel will
be conducted by Dr. Charles Petty. Dr. Petty.
Dr. PETTY. Thank you. Dr. Finck, we are going to try to take
you back to the night of the actual autopsy that was carried
on on the body of the then President Kennedy. When did you
arrive first in the autopsy room?
Dr. FINCK. It was approximately 2030 hours, 8:30 p.m.
Dr. PETTY. Was the autopsy in progress at that time?
Dr. FINCK. Yes, it was. I arrived after the start of the autopsy.
You wrote: "In this case, because of extensive damage to the Cranium,
Post by claviger
brain examination and removal came first after Photos and
X-rays."
Do you not consider removing the brain for examination part of the
autopsy? What would you call it?
claviger
2019-05-20 02:17:58 UTC
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Post by Steve M. Galbraith
Post by claviger
Post by Steve M. Galbraith
Post by claviger
I consider O'Connor a solid witness. Obviously he was not aware
the brain had been removed before the autopsy and for whatever
reason CDR Humes did not share that info with him.
O'Connor was in-country Vietnam and wounded in combat. Would
think he observed various wounds on both US Marines and enemy
soldiers. Then his next tour of duty was Bethesda NH for probably
12 to 24 months.
After his Navy career he became a Deputy Sheriff in Florida. Most
likely he saw wounded victims and suspects, learning more about
weapons and the wounds they make.
Sorry, the brain was removed BEFORE the autopsy? How did that happen?
(A) Visual examination
(B) Photos + X-rays
(C) Torso Procedure
(D) Brain Removal
In this case, because of extensive damage to the Cranium,
brain examination and removal came first after Photos and
X-rays.
Post by Steve M. Galbraith
They removed fragments of a bullet from JFK's brain during
the autopsy. If there was no brain then where were these
fragments located?
I would assume: (C) Brain Examination/Removal
Post by Steve M. Galbraith
And the x-rays of the skull show minute particles - "snowstorm" - in it.
Correct.
Post by Steve M. Galbraith
If there was no brain then were these particles floating in empty space?
There had to be something for these particles to be deposited in.
What am I getting wrong here, please?
ARRB DEPOSITION OF DR. J THORNTON BOSWELL, 2/26/96
http://mcadams.posc.mu.edu/russ/testimony/boswella.htm
HSCA Deposition of Pierre Finck - Kennedy Assassination Home Page
mcadams.posc.mu.edu/russ/testimony/finckhsca.htm
Dr. Finck, we are going to try to take you back to the night of the actual
autopsy .... Pierre, in your subsequent testimony in the trial I believe
you were asked about ...
TESTIMONY OF PIERRE A. FINCK
http://mcadams.posc.mu.edu/russ/testimony/finckhsca.htm
http://mcadams.posc.mu.edu/russ/testimony/finckhsca.htm
Mr. PURDY. Please state your full name and address.
Dr. FINCK. My first name is Pierre, P-i-e-r-r-e, middle initial A.,
last name Finck, F-i-n-c-k. My address is Avenue D'Orbaix,
No. 14, 1180 Brussels, Belgium.
Mr. PURDY. What is your present employment?
Dr. FINCK. I am retired doing part time instruction.
Mr. PURDY. The initial questioning for the medical panel will
be conducted by Dr. Charles Petty. Dr. Petty.
Dr. PETTY. Thank you. Dr. Finck, we are going to try to take
you back to the night of the actual autopsy that was carried
on on the body of the then President Kennedy. When did you
arrive first in the autopsy room?
Dr. FINCK. It was approximately 2030 hours, 8:30 p.m.
Dr. PETTY. Was the autopsy in progress at that time?
Dr. FINCK. Yes, it was. I arrived after the start of the autopsy.
You wrote: "In this case, because of extensive damage to the Cranium,
Post by claviger
brain examination and removal came first after Photos and
X-rays."
Do you not consider removing the brain for examination part of the
autopsy? What would you call it?
Of course it is. I concede your point. All 4 steps are certainly part of
any autopsy. Allow me to restate the situation. The requested US Army
expert observer was 30 minutes late and did not observe the brain
examination and extraction phase of the process.

Somewhere I read Humes and Boswell removed the brain after Phase Two of
required autopsy Photos and X-rays with no one else present observing the
removal procedure. Therefore I would surmise there was 15 minute gap
between technical Photos/X-rays and the late arrival of Dr. Finck.

According to Humes the cranium was missing a large part of the skull bone
so they decided to remove the brain with minor surgical effort. The fact
no other witness observed that process fueled all kinds of CT hysteria. It
was a mistake to do that procedure before the invited expert arrived to
examine the head wound in-situ and this step was out of normal sequence.
However this was anything but a "normal situation." All the more reason to
follow standard operating practice.

While that was a procedural difference and in hindsight a mistake in
judgement, I don't know what these two minimal surgeons could have done in
15 minutes to alter anything about the gunshot wound. Dr. Finck could
walk in at any moment if they were attempting to do anything
inappropriate. The point is there was only a 15 minute gap between the
required photo/x-ray regimen and Col. Finck arrival.

This is the long-way around explanation why Corpsman O'Connor was not
present at the time of brain extraction, and was shocked the brain was
missing. It was his assigned duty to assist in removal and weigh the
brain. If he assumed the normal procedure was being followed and no one
told him different, then he assumed the President arrived at Bethesda NH
in the same condition he observed. Why no one ever explained to O'Connor
what really happened is a mystery in itself.
Anthony Marsh
2019-05-20 17:13:44 UTC
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Post by Steve M. Galbraith
Post by claviger
Post by Steve M. Galbraith
Post by claviger
I consider O'Connor a solid witness. Obviously he was not aware
the brain had been removed before the autopsy and for whatever
reason CDR Humes did not share that info with him.
O'Connor was in-country Vietnam and wounded in combat. Would
think he observed various wounds on both US Marines and enemy
soldiers. Then his next tour of duty was Bethesda NH for probably
12 to 24 months.
After his Navy career he became a Deputy Sheriff in Florida. Most
likely he saw wounded victims and suspects, learning more about
weapons and the wounds they make.
Sorry, the brain was removed BEFORE the autopsy? How did that happen?
(A) Visual examination
(B) Photos + X-rays
(C) Torso Procedure
(D) Brain Removal
In this case, because of extensive damage to the Cranium,
brain examination and removal came first after Photos and
X-rays.
Post by Steve M. Galbraith
They removed fragments of a bullet from JFK's brain during
the autopsy. If there was no brain then where were these
fragments located?
I would assume: (C) Brain Examination/Removal
Post by Steve M. Galbraith
And the x-rays of the skull show minute particles - "snowstorm" - in it.
Correct.
Post by Steve M. Galbraith
If there was no brain then were these particles floating in empty space?
There had to be something for these particles to be deposited in.
What am I getting wrong here, please?
ARRB DEPOSITION OF DR. J THORNTON BOSWELL, 2/26/96
http://mcadams.posc.mu.edu/russ/testimony/boswella.htm
HSCA Deposition of Pierre Finck - Kennedy Assassination Home Page
mcadams.posc.mu.edu/russ/testimony/finckhsca.htm
Dr. Finck, we are going to try to take you back to the night of the actual
autopsy .... Pierre, in your subsequent testimony in the trial I believe
you were asked about ...
TESTIMONY OF PIERRE A. FINCK
http://mcadams.posc.mu.edu/russ/testimony/finckhsca.htm
http://mcadams.posc.mu.edu/russ/testimony/finckhsca.htm
Mr. PURDY. Please state your full name and address.
Dr. FINCK. My first name is Pierre, P-i-e-r-r-e, middle initial A.,
last name Finck, F-i-n-c-k. My address is Avenue D'Orbaix,
No. 14, 1180 Brussels, Belgium.
Mr. PURDY. What is your present employment?
Dr. FINCK. I am retired doing part time instruction.
Mr. PURDY. The initial questioning for the medical panel will
be conducted by Dr. Charles Petty. Dr. Petty.
Dr. PETTY. Thank you. Dr. Finck, we are going to try to take
you back to the night of the actual autopsy that was carried
on on the body of the then President Kennedy. When did you
arrive first in the autopsy room?
Dr. FINCK. It was approximately 2030 hours, 8:30 p.m.
Dr. PETTY. Was the autopsy in progress at that time?
Dr. FINCK. Yes, it was. I arrived after the start of the autopsy.
You wrote: "In this case, because of extensive damage to the Cranium,
Post by claviger
brain examination and removal came first after Photos and
X-rays."
Do you not consider removing the brain for examination part of the
autopsy? What would you call it?
Removal of the brain is part of many autopsies. In the case of JFK very
little surgery was required to remove the brain. Most of the skull bones
fell away when they removed the wrapping.
claviger
2019-05-19 02:53:35 UTC
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Post by claviger
Post by Steve M. Galbraith
Post by claviger
I consider O'Connor a solid witness. Obviously he was not aware
the brain had been removed before the autopsy and for whatever
reason CDR Humes did not share that info with him.
O'Connor was in-country Vietnam and wounded in combat. Would
think he observed various wounds on both US Marines and enemy
soldiers. Then his next tour of duty was Bethesda NH for probably
12 to 24 months.
After his Navy career he became a Deputy Sheriff in Florida. Most
likely he saw wounded victims and suspects, learning more about
weapons and the wounds they make.
Sorry, the brain was removed BEFORE the autopsy? How did that happen?
(A) Visual examination
(B) Photos + X-rays
(C) Torso Procedure
(D) Brain Removal
In this case, because of extensive damage to the Cranium,
brain examination and removal came first after Photos and
X-rays.
Post by Steve M. Galbraith
They removed fragments of a bullet from JFK's brain during
the autopsy. If there was no brain then where were these
fragments located?
I would assume: (C) Brain Examination/Removal
Post by Steve M. Galbraith
And the x-rays of the skull show minute particles - "snowstorm" - in it.
Correct.
Post by Steve M. Galbraith
If there was no brain then were these particles floating in empty space?
There had to be something for these particles to be deposited in.
What am I getting wrong here, please?
ARRB DEPOSITION OF DR. J THORNTON BOSWELL, 2/26/96
http://mcadams.posc.mu.edu/russ/testimony/boswella.htm
HSCA Deposition of Pierre Finck - Kennedy Assassination Home Page
mcadams.posc.mu.edu/russ/testimony/finckhsca.htm
Dr. Finck, we are going to try to take you back to the night of the actual
autopsy .... Pierre, in your subsequent testimony in the trial I believe
you were asked about ...
TESTIMONY OF PIERRE A. FINCK
http://mcadams.posc.mu.edu/russ/testimony/finckhsca.htm
http://mcadams.posc.mu.edu/russ/testimony/finckhsca.htm
Mr. PURDY. Please state your full name and address.
Dr. FINCK. My first name is Pierre, P-i-e-r-r-e, middle initial A.,
last name Finck, F-i-n-c-k. My address is Avenue D'Orbaix,
No. 14, 1180 Brussels, Belgium.
Mr. PURDY. What is your present employment?
Dr. FINCK. I am retired doing part time instruction.
Mr. PURDY. The initial questioning for the medical panel will
be conducted by Dr. Charles Petty. Dr. Petty.
Dr. PETTY. Thank you. Dr. Finck, we are going to try to take
you back to the night of the actual autopsy that was carried
on on the body of the then President Kennedy. When did you
arrive first in the autopsy room?
Dr. FINCK. It was approximately 2030 hours, 8:30 p.m.
Dr. PETTY. Was the autopsy in progress at that time?
Dr. FINCK. Yes, it was. I arrived after the start of the autopsy.
"By 7:30 p.m., Humes was in his scrubs in the hospital`s new morgue, built
only four months earlier. He had selected Dr. Boswell as his assistant."
Anthony Marsh
2019-05-18 15:24:18 UTC
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Post by Steve M. Galbraith
Post by claviger
Post by bigdog
Post by claviger
USN Corpsman Paul K. O'Connor served in combat during
his tour of duty in Vietnam earning a Purple Heart. After his
training at Bethesda Naval Hospital he would later became
a Deputy Sheriff in Brevard County, FL. To say he learned
about rifle and pistol wounds the hard way hands-on would
be an accurate statement.
Paul O'Connor was interviewed by William Matson Law for his book,
In the Eye of History: Disclosures in the JFK Assassination Medical
Evidence.
Law: After you traced the wound, what happened then?
O'Connor: After that, we looked at the head wound and found
that there were no bullets in the cranium. Minute fragments
were scattered through he bone area of the cranium front and
back.
I remember distinctly because, having worked in funeral homes
since I was thirteen years old, I had seen bullet wounds before,
and also I served in Vietnam and saw bullet wounds there.
It looked to me like a bomb had exploded inside his brain and
blew out the whole side of his head. I've never seen a more
horrendous destruction of the cranium, unless it was done by
a very high caliber weapon. I found out later that it was done
by a Mannlicher Carcano - a cheap Italian rifle - just about what
I would call a thirty caliber or a thirty-thirty caliber rifle.
Law: In your opinion is it capable of doing that kind of damage?
O'Connor: Absolutely not.
Seriously? You've resorted to citing O'Connor. I suppose you could
find somebody less credible but it is hard to imagine how?
I consider O'Connor a solid witness. Obviously he was not aware
the brain had been removed before the autopsy and for whatever
reason CDR Humes did not share that info with him.
O'Connor was in-country Vietnam and wounded in combat. Would
think he observed various wounds on both US Marines and enemy
soldiers. Then his next tour of duty was Bethesda NH for probably
12 to 24 months.
After his Navy career he became a Deputy Sheriff in Florida. Most
likely he saw wounded victims and suspects, learning more about
weapons and the wounds they make.
Sorry, the brain was removed BEFORE the autopsy? How did that happen? They
removed fragments of a bullet from JFK's brain during the autopsy. If
there was no brain then where were these fragments located?
And the x-rays of the skull show minute particles - "snowstorm" - in it.
If there was no brain then were these particles floating in empty space?
There had to be something for these particles to be deposited in.
What am I getting wrong here, please?
He probably meant before the embalming.
claviger
2019-05-19 01:45:30 UTC
Reply
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Post by Steve M. Galbraith
Sorry, the brain was removed BEFORE the autopsy? How did that happen? They
removed fragments of a bullet from JFK's brain during the autopsy. If
there was no brain then where were these fragments located?
And the x-rays of the skull show minute particles - "snowstorm" - in it.
If there was no brain then were these particles floating in empty space?
There had to be something for these particles to be deposited in.
What am I getting wrong here, please?
Here is what I'm guessing:
Autopsy began 8:00 pm
Photos Taken 8:00 - 8:15 pm
Brain RemovaL 8:15 - 8:25 pm
Dr Finck Arrives 8:30 pm
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