Discussion:
Interesting tidbit about the origin of the term factoid
(too old to reply)
bigdog
2018-05-06 00:29:22 UTC
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We've seen this term used quite a bit in this newsgroup to describe myths
that have been presented as established facts. While watching Jeopardy
last night, I learned the term was originated by Norman Mailer in 1973 to
describe things reported by the news media and accepted as fact without
evidence to support them. He coined the term in his biography of Marilyn
Monroe. I'm sure there were many factoids regarding her life and death.
Anthony Marsh
2018-05-07 00:35:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by bigdog
We've seen this term used quite a bit in this newsgroup to describe myths
that have been presented as established facts. While watching Jeopardy
last night, I learned the term was originated by Norman Mailer in 1973 to
describe things reported by the news media and accepted as fact without
evidence to support them. He coined the term in his biography of Marilyn
Monroe. I'm sure there were many factoids regarding her life and death.
Is that the same Norman Mailer who worked for the CIA and wrote lies
for them?
Steve BH
2018-05-08 01:51:51 UTC
Permalink
He wrote factoids for them.

In his youth he coined “What, me worry?” If you see a
child pic of him you will understand.
Jason Burke
2018-05-08 01:52:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by bigdog
We've seen this term used quite a bit in this newsgroup to describe myths
that have been presented as established facts. While watching Jeopardy
last night, I learned the term was originated by Norman Mailer in 1973 to
describe things reported by the news media and accepted as fact without
evidence to support them. He coined the term in his biography of Marilyn
Monroe. I'm sure there were many factoids regarding her life and death.
Is that the same Norman Mailer who worked for the  CIA and wrote lies
for them?
No. Totally different guy.
But thanks for playing.
Ace Kefford
2018-05-08 02:09:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by bigdog
We've seen this term used quite a bit in this newsgroup to describe myths
that have been presented as established facts. While watching Jeopardy
last night, I learned the term was originated by Norman Mailer in 1973 to
describe things reported by the news media and accepted as fact without
evidence to support them. He coined the term in his biography of Marilyn
Monroe. I'm sure there were many factoids regarding her life and death.
For years the use of "factoid" in a Boston Globe article would be followed
a week or so later by a published letter to the editor from one of Norman
Mailer's wives pointing out the original creation and meaning of
"factoid."
Anthony Marsh
2018-05-08 23:48:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ace Kefford
Post by bigdog
We've seen this term used quite a bit in this newsgroup to describe myths
that have been presented as established facts. While watching Jeopardy
last night, I learned the term was originated by Norman Mailer in 1973 to
describe things reported by the news media and accepted as fact without
evidence to support them. He coined the term in his biography of Marilyn
Monroe. I'm sure there were many factoids regarding her life and death.
For years the use of "factoid" in a Boston Globe article would be followed
a week or so later by a published letter to the editor from one of Norman
Mailer's wives pointing out the original creation and meaning of
"factoid."
Is that true or is it just a factoid?
mainframetech
2018-05-08 17:28:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by bigdog
We've seen this term used quite a bit in this newsgroup to describe myths
that have been presented as established facts. While watching Jeopardy
last night, I learned the term was originated by Norman Mailer in 1973 to
describe things reported by the news media and accepted as fact without
evidence to support them. He coined the term in his biography of Marilyn
Monroe. I'm sure there were many factoids regarding her life and death.
Certainly many started from the WCR too.

Chris
bigdog
2018-05-08 23:56:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by mainframetech
Post by bigdog
We've seen this term used quite a bit in this newsgroup to describe myths
that have been presented as established facts. While watching Jeopardy
last night, I learned the term was originated by Norman Mailer in 1973 to
describe things reported by the news media and accepted as fact without
evidence to support them. He coined the term in his biography of Marilyn
Monroe. I'm sure there were many factoids regarding her life and death.
Certainly many started from the WCR too.
That would be a factoid.

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