Discussion:
Seymour Hersh The Dark Side of Camelot
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BOZ
2019-05-12 18:05:07 UTC
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Hersh's 1997 book about John F. Kennedy, The Dark Side of Camelot, made a
number of controversial assertions about the former president, including
that:

Though Jacqueline Bouvier officially was his first wife, his actual first
marriage was to a woman named Durie Malcolm that was never legally
terminated and was hushed up by his father Joseph P. Kennedy Sr..

He had been a semi-regular narcotics user, receiving injections from Dr.
Max Jacobson.

He had had a close working relationship with American Mafia boss Sam
Giancana that supposedly included vote fraud in one or two crucial states
in the 1960 presidential election.

In 1958, when he was a member of the United States Senate, he had an
extramarital affair with "an attractive aide in [his] Senate office,"
Pamela Turnure. This was three years before she became First Lady
Jacqueline Kennedy's press secretary. In 1958, Turnure's landlady Florence
Kater took a photograph of the senator leaving Turnure's apartment in the
middle of the night, a photograph that Kater tried repeatedly to bring to
public attention to ruin the senator's presidential campaign.[71]

"On May 14, 1960," says The Dark Side of Camelot, "just four days after
Kennedy won the West Virginia primary, [Florence Kater] approached him at
a political rally at the University of Maryland carrying a placard with an
enlarged snapshot of the early-morning scene outside Pamela Turnure's
apartment. Kennedy ignored her, but a photograph of the encounter was
published in the next afternoon's Washington Star, along with a brief
story describing her as a heckler."[72]

The reels of microfilm for The Washington Star that cover the month of May
1960 indicate that the newspaper, then known as The Evening Star of
Washington, D.C. and The Sunday Star, never published an article about
Florence Kater, nor did the article about Kennedy's campaign appearance at
the University of Maryland mention a heckler.
Anthony Marsh
2019-05-13 14:21:21 UTC
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Post by BOZ
Hersh's 1997 book about John F. Kennedy, The Dark Side of Camelot, made a
number of controversial assertions about the former president, including
Though Jacqueline Bouvier officially was his first wife, his actual first
marriage was to a woman named Durie Malcolm that was never legally
terminated and was hushed up by his father Joseph P. Kennedy Sr..
He had been a semi-regular narcotics user, receiving injections from Dr.
Max Jacobson.
He had had a close working relationship with American Mafia boss Sam
Giancana that supposedly included vote fraud in one or two crucial states
in the 1960 presidential election.
In 1958, when he was a member of the United States Senate, he had an
extramarital affair with "an attractive aide in [his] Senate office,"
Pamela Turnure. This was three years before she became First Lady
Jacqueline Kennedy's press secretary. In 1958, Turnure's landlady Florence
Kater took a photograph of the senator leaving Turnure's apartment in the
middle of the night, a photograph that Kater tried repeatedly to bring to
public attention to ruin the senator's presidential campaign.[71]
"On May 14, 1960," says The Dark Side of Camelot, "just four days after
Kennedy won the West Virginia primary, [Florence Kater] approached him at
a political rally at the University of Maryland carrying a placard with an
enlarged snapshot of the early-morning scene outside Pamela Turnure's
apartment. Kennedy ignored her, but a photograph of the encounter was
published in the next afternoon's Washington Star, along with a brief
story describing her as a heckler."[72]
The reels of microfilm for The Washington Star that cover the month of May
1960 indicate that the newspaper, then known as The Evening Star of
Washington, D.C. and The Sunday Star, never published an article about
Florence Kater, nor did the article about Kennedy's campaign appearance at
the University of Maryland mention a heckler.
We already knew all that, some of us knew it at the time.
Tell us more about the German spy and Frick and Frack.

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