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Witnesses of shot from Grassy Knoll...
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claviger
2018-06-03 23:03:21 UTC
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How the hell should I know?
I only act like I have all the answers

Wednesday, October 30, 2013

Witnesses of shot from Grassy Knoll...

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Grassy Knoll Witnesses
Evidence of Shots from the Front

About 40 witnesses to the assassination of President Kennedy claimed
either to have heard gunshots from the infamous grassy knoll in the
northwest corner of Dealey Plaza, or to have seen smoke or smelled
gunpowder in that area. Interviewing the Dealey Plaza Witnesses

Several of these witnesses were interviewed by newspaper, radio and
television reporters immediately after the assassination. The interviews
were influential in generating doubt about the lone–gunman theory.
Many other interviews have been carried out in the years since the
assassination, almost all of them by private researchers.

Examination of photographs and home movies suggests that there were
perhaps as many as 600 people in Dealey Plaza at the time of the
assassination. Official interviews or statements exist for around 200 of
these witnesses. Because the Warren Commission did no investigation of its
own, almost all of the witnesses who testified before the Commission were
chosen from those who had already made official statements. The other 400
or so, including many of the spectators nearest to the president, were
never interviewed officially at all. Few of these missing witnesses were
identified, even when the authorities had been informed of their existence
(Warren Commission Hearings, vol.15, pp.525f).

In many cases, the witnesses appear not to have been asked about the
origin of the shots. Of those who were asked, probably a small majority
claimed that the shots came from the general direction of the Texas School
Book Depository. A handful of people claimed to have heard shots from both
directions. Many had no opinion.

Status of the Dealey Plaza Witness Evidence

Most of the evidence quoted below falls into four categories:

contemporaneous reports by journalists who were in Dealey Plaza;
statements to the police or sheriff’s deputies within hours of the
assassination;
statements to the FBI, mostly within a few days of the assassination;
and interviews by the Warren Commission’s staff attorneys several
months after the assassination.

None of the official evidence became publicly available until the Warren
Commission’s Hearings and Exhibits were issued in November 1964.
Some of it was not published at all, but was placed in the National
Archives, and was only discovered at a later date. Access to the evidence
was not helped by the fact that the witnesses’ statements and
testimony were scattered throughout many of the 26 volumes of the Hearings
and Exhibits, none of which contained an index.

There are some curiosities within the evidence:

Emmett Hudson, the only man identified out of the three standing on the
steps leading up to the fence on the grassy knoll, claimed that all the
shots came from the general direction of the TSBD (see Warren Commission
Hearings, vol.7, p.560 and p.564; his earliest statements, however, are
ambiguous) Buell Wesley Frazier, Billy Lovelady and Otis Williams, three
men who were standing on the front steps of the TSBD, directly underneath
the supposed sniper’s nest, claimed that all the shots came from
the general direction of the knoll.

Charles Brehm, who had an excellent view of the assassination, either
changed his mind or was misquoted. He was reported in the Dallas Times
Herald on the evening of 22 November as thinking that “the shots
came from in front of or beside the President.” The FBI two days
later stated that “it seemed quite apparent to him that the shots
came from one or two buildings back at the corner of Elm and Houston
Streets” (Warren Commission Hearings, vol.22, p.837).

Arnold Rowland thought the shots had come from the knoll, despite already
having seen a man in the southwest window of the sixth floor of the TSBD,
holding a gun (Warren Commission Hearings, vol.2, pp.171–3).

Kenneth O’Donnell and David Powers nominated the TSBD in their
testimony, but believed in private that shots had come from the knoll.

Witnesses to Shots from the Grassy Knoll

Here is a list, in alphabetical order by surname, and no doubt incomplete,
of those witnesses to President Kennedy’s assassination who
claimed that one or more shots came from the general direction of the
grassy knoll:
Anthony Marsh
2018-06-04 23:48:04 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by claviger
How the hell should I know?
I only act like I have all the answers
Wednesday, October 30, 2013
Witnesses of shot from Grassy Knoll...
http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-d_kVhCu4fD8/UnG9dP9LNoI/AAAAAAAAlCI/C8XgpNMhUqE/s1600/maxresdefault.jpg
Grassy Knoll Witnesses
Evidence of Shots from the Front
About 40 witnesses to the assassination of President Kennedy claimed
either to have heard gunshots from the infamous grassy knoll in the
northwest corner of Dealey Plaza, or to have seen smoke or smelled
gunpowder in that area. Interviewing the Dealey Plaza Witnesses
Several of these witnesses were interviewed by newspaper, radio and
television reporters immediately after the assassination. The interviews
were influential in generating doubt about the lone–gunman theory.
Many other interviews have been carried out in the years since the
assassination, almost all of them by private researchers.
Examination of photographs and home movies suggests that there were
perhaps as many as 600 people in Dealey Plaza at the time of the
assassination. Official interviews or statements exist for around 200 of
these witnesses. Because the Warren Commission did no investigation of its
own, almost all of the witnesses who testified before the Commission were
chosen from those who had already made official statements. The other 400
or so, including many of the spectators nearest to the president, were
never interviewed officially at all. Few of these missing witnesses were
identified, even when the authorities had been informed of their existence
(Warren Commission Hearings, vol.15, pp.525f).
In many cases, the witnesses appear not to have been asked about the
origin of the shots. Of those who were asked, probably a small majority
claimed that the shots came from the general direction of the Texas School
Book Depository. A handful of people claimed to have heard shots from both
directions. Many had no opinion.
Status of the Dealey Plaza Witness Evidence
contemporaneous reports by journalists who were in Dealey Plaza;
statements to the police or sheriff’s deputies within hours of the
assassination;
statements to the FBI, mostly within a few days of the assassination;
and interviews by the Warren Commission’s staff attorneys several
months after the assassination.
None of the official evidence became publicly available until the Warren
Commission’s Hearings and Exhibits were issued in November 1964.
Some of it was not published at all, but was placed in the National
Archives, and was only discovered at a later date. Access to the evidence
was not helped by the fact that the witnesses’ statements and
testimony were scattered throughout many of the 26 volumes of the Hearings
and Exhibits, none of which contained an index.
Emmett Hudson, the only man identified out of the three standing on the
steps leading up to the fence on the grassy knoll, claimed that all the
shots came from the general direction of the TSBD (see Warren Commission
Hearings, vol.7, p.560 and p.564; his earliest statements, however, are
ambiguous) Buell Wesley Frazier, Billy Lovelady and Otis Williams, three
men who were standing on the front steps of the TSBD, directly underneath
the supposed sniper’s nest, claimed that all the shots came from
the general direction of the knoll.
So what?
Post by claviger
Charles Brehm, who had an excellent view of the assassination, either
changed his mind or was misquoted. He was reported in the Dallas Times
Herald on the evening of 22 November as thinking that “the shots
came from in front of or beside the President.” The FBI two days
later stated that “it seemed quite apparent to him that the shots
came from one or two buildings back at the corner of Elm and Houston
Streets” (Warren Commission Hearings, vol.22, p.837).
So now you're claiming shots from 2 buildings?
And that doesn't smell like conspritacy to you?
Post by claviger
Arnold Rowland thought the shots had come from the knoll, despite already
having seen a man in the southwest window of the sixth floor of the TSBD,
holding a gun (Warren Commission Hearings, vol.2, pp.171–3).
Kenneth O’Donnell and David Powers nominated the TSBD in their
testimony, but believed in private that shots had come from the knoll.
Witnesses to Shots from the Grassy Knoll
Here is a list, in alphabetical order by surname, and no doubt incomplete,
of those witnesses to President Kennedy’s assassination who
claimed that one or more shots came from the general direction of the
So now you're a conspiracy believer?
claviger
2018-06-12 12:43:47 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Anthony Marsh
Post by claviger
How the hell should I know?
I only act like I have all the answers
Wednesday, October 30, 2013
Witnesses of shot from Grassy Knoll...
http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-d_kVhCu4fD8/UnG9dP9LNoI/AAAAAAAAlCI/C8XgpNMhUqE/s1600/maxresdefault.jpg
Grassy Knoll Witnesses
Evidence of Shots from the Front
About 40 witnesses to the assassination of President Kennedy claimed
either to have heard gunshots from the infamous grassy knoll in the
northwest corner of Dealey Plaza, or to have seen smoke or smelled
gunpowder in that area. Interviewing the Dealey Plaza Witnesses
Several of these witnesses were interviewed by newspaper, radio and
television reporters immediately after the assassination. The interviews
were influential in generating doubt about the lone–gunman theory.
Many other interviews have been carried out in the years since the
assassination, almost all of them by private researchers.
Examination of photographs and home movies suggests that there were
perhaps as many as 600 people in Dealey Plaza at the time of the
assassination. Official interviews or statements exist for around 200 of
these witnesses. Because the Warren Commission did no investigation of its
own, almost all of the witnesses who testified before the Commission were
chosen from those who had already made official statements. The other 400
or so, including many of the spectators nearest to the president, were
never interviewed officially at all. Few of these missing witnesses were
identified, even when the authorities had been informed of their existence
(Warren Commission Hearings, vol.15, pp.525f).
In many cases, the witnesses appear not to have been asked about the
origin of the shots. Of those who were asked, probably a small majority
claimed that the shots came from the general direction of the Texas School
Book Depository. A handful of people claimed to have heard shots from both
directions. Many had no opinion.
Status of the Dealey Plaza Witness Evidence
contemporaneous reports by journalists who were in Dealey Plaza;
statements to the police or sheriff’s deputies within hours of the
assassination;
statements to the FBI, mostly within a few days of the assassination;
and interviews by the Warren Commission’s staff attorneys several
months after the assassination.
None of the official evidence became publicly available until the Warren
Commission’s Hearings and Exhibits were issued in November 1964.
Some of it was not published at all, but was placed in the National
Archives, and was only discovered at a later date. Access to the evidence
was not helped by the fact that the witnesses’ statements and
testimony were scattered throughout many of the 26 volumes of the Hearings
and Exhibits, none of which contained an index.
Emmett Hudson, the only man identified out of the three standing on the
steps leading up to the fence on the grassy knoll, claimed that all the
shots came from the general direction of the TSBD (see Warren Commission
Hearings, vol.7, p.560 and p.564; his earliest statements, however, are
ambiguous) Buell Wesley Frazier, Billy Lovelady and Otis Williams, three
men who were standing on the front steps of the TSBD, directly underneath
the supposed sniper’s nest, claimed that all the shots came from
the general direction of the knoll.
So what?
Post by claviger
Charles Brehm, who had an excellent view of the assassination, either
changed his mind or was misquoted. He was reported in the Dallas Times
Herald on the evening of 22 November as thinking that “the shots
came from in front of or beside the President.” The FBI two days
later stated that “it seemed quite apparent to him that the shots
came from one or two buildings back at the corner of Elm and Houston
Streets” (Warren Commission Hearings, vol.22, p.837).
So now you're claiming shots from 2 buildings?
And that doesn't smell like conspritacy to you?
Post by claviger
Arnold Rowland thought the shots had come from the knoll, despite already
having seen a man in the southwest window of the sixth floor of the TSBD,
holding a gun (Warren Commission Hearings, vol.2, pp.171–3).
Kenneth O’Donnell and David Powers nominated the TSBD in their
testimony, but believed in private that shots had come from the knoll.
Witnesses to Shots from the Grassy Knoll
Here is a list, in alphabetical order by surname, and no doubt incomplete,
of those witnesses to President Kennedy’s assassination who
claimed that one or more shots came from the general direction of the
So now you're a conspiracy believer?
You're barking at the TV screen again.

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