Discussion:
story surfaced in Henry Hurt's Reasonable Doubt
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BOZ
2018-07-01 17:59:06 UTC
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ACCORDING TO Joseph Persico:

Though much of The Sword and the Shield is drawn from Andrew's earlier
works and collaborations, the book does contain fresh revelations" and
then he adds that "several of the much-publicized revelations, however,
hardly qualify as such. For instance, the authors tell how the K.G.B.
forged a letter from Lee Harvey Oswald to E. Howard Hunt, the former
C.I.A. officer and later Watergate conspirator, in order to implicate the
C.I.A. in the Kennedy assassination. Actually, this story surfaced in
Henry Hurt's Reasonable Doubt, written 13 years ago. Similarly, the story
that the K.G.B. considered schemes for breaking the legs of the ballet
dancer Rudolf Nureyev for defecting to the West was first reported in a
book written six years ago." And he added that "it does seem odd that a
key K.G.B. archivist never had access to a copying machine, but had to
copy thousands of pages in longhand. Still, the overall impact of this
volume is convincing, though none of the material will send historians
scurrying to rewrite their books.
Anthony Marsh
2018-07-02 17:30:36 UTC
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Post by BOZ
Though much of The Sword and the Shield is drawn from Andrew's earlier
works and collaborations, the book does contain fresh revelations" and
then he adds that "several of the much-publicized revelations, however,
hardly qualify as such. For instance, the authors tell how the K.G.B.
forged a letter from Lee Harvey Oswald to E. Howard Hunt, the former
C.I.A. officer and later Watergate conspirator, in order to implicate the
C.I.A. in the Kennedy assassination. Actually, this story surfaced in
I've written about this before. If it really was a KGB hoax it wasn't done
very professionally. E. Howard Hunt would never use his real name when
recruiting an asset. He would use an alias. So the Dear Mr. Hunt is a dead
giveaway that an amateur did it. Some have suspected that it was a fired
security guard who used to work for H.L. Hunt, the oil magnate.
Post by BOZ
Henry Hurt's Reasonable Doubt, written 13 years ago. Similarly, the story
that the K.G.B. considered schemes for breaking the legs of the ballet
dancer Rudolf Nureyev for defecting to the West was first reported in a
book written six years ago." And he added that "it does seem odd that a
key K.G.B. archivist never had access to a copying machine, but had to
copy thousands of pages in longhand. Still, the overall impact of this
volume is convincing, though none of the material will send historians
scurrying to rewrite their books.
I think maybe his fellow office workers might see him copying files on
the copy machine in violation of the security rules.

When I copied files at the JFK Library the machine used yellow paper so
they could spot people trying to steal documents. They always examined my
papers coming in and going out.

Remember the KGB who reconstructed files by memory so he never had to
sneak anything out? That is what they were training my father to do, but
they gave him some bad drugs that didn't work as planned.

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